Relapsing Polychondritis, an Unusual Cause of Respiratory Failure: A Senegalese Case Report

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Kane B.S, Ndao A.C, Sow M, et al.

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Published: 5 August 2019 | Article Type :

Abstract

Background: Relapsing polychondritis is a rare systemic disease which is characterised by recurrent inflammation of cartilaginous structures. The involvment of laryngo-trachio-bronchial pathway is the most serious condition of this disease. We report the first complete observation of RP in our area, revealed by chondritis of the respiratory tree with respiratory failure in a Senegalese patient.

Case Presentation: A 39-year-old female Senegalese black patient was admitted in our Institution for a diagnostic challenge and the management of respiratory failure. Clinical examination also showed a saddle nose deformity and a right chronic chondritis of the pinna of the ear. Laboratory investigations revealed a biological inflammatory syndrome and antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies were negative. Cervical computed tomography showed a complete obstruction of the tracheobronchial pathway. The immediate change was marked by respiratory arrest, requiring its transfer in reanimation. The patient was stabilised by mechanical ventilation and administration of methylprednisolone.

Conclusions: In our observation, the RP has been revealed by chondritis of the respiratory tree. This condition may challenge the vital prognosis. Its evolution can be favourable, butit requires early diagnosis and “aggressive” management.

Keywords: Relapsing polychondritis; Emergencies; Africa south of the Sahara; Case report.

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Kane B.S, Ndao A.C, Sow M, et al.. (2019-08-05). "Relapsing Polychondritis, an Unusual Cause of Respiratory Failure: A Senegalese Case Report." *Volume 2*, 1, 51-54